Tag Archives: activities

Getting that itch to skate?

This was Patri­cia Lake on Mon­day 5th of Decem­ber. The ice is about 1/2 inch (1.27cm) thick and was checked sci­en­tif­i­cal­ly by our @alpineart guy of @jasperweddings trans­port ser­vice.  After step­ping on to the ice, need­less to say, it was not thick enough to sup­port any weight just yet.

The scientific check
The sci­en­tif­ic check
thin ice
Art hold­ing a piece of ice that is about 1/2 inch thick

The lake looks hope­ful for the end of this week, the nights are drop­ping to the minus 20 range, and if the snow holds off, the ice will be very smooth.

Still thin ice on Patricia Lake
Still thin ice on Patri­cia Lake

This is a warn­ing to those who want to explore areas that are not ready for any activ­i­ties on lakes. The crack shot off across the lake in mere sec­onds when the ice broke through along the bank.

thin ice Patricia Lake
After break­ing through, the crack shot across the lake in sec­onds

RELATED LINKS:

Sweet Fresh Pow

With snow, comes more activ­i­ties to play. Cross-country ski­ing, Snow­shoe­ing and Sled­ding. With spurts of snow­fall teas­ing us with thoughts of pow­der days at Mar­mot Basin. Moth­er nature is play­ing games with us this sea­son.

Marmot Basin Morning
View in the morn­ing from Mar­mot Basin
Jasper Freeride Development Team
Warm-up pri­or to ski day is essen­tial, Jasper Freeride Club morn­ing rou­tine.

Just wait­ing for the cold spell to arrive this week, so the lake ice can freeze for some good Skat­ing and for some Ice Climb­ing.

Near Beckers Chalets
View of Athabas­ca Riv­er

Ski­ing is only get­ting bet­ter with the accu­mu­la­tion of snow fall. Pho­to below was tak­en on the ridge above the Eagle Express. The snow was not as stiff as the west side of the Ridge Chair.

View from ridge of Poachers
The snow here beside Poach­ers was still fine.

RELATED LINKS:
Jasper

Hin­ton

Two Valley Canyon

Canyon discoveries in Maligne Valley

This gem is great year round, ice for­ma­tions in the win­ter and water fall in the sum­mer. Some adven­tur­ists repel the water­fall while it is ful­ly gush­ing with water for thrills. This canyon is also nick­named Bull­shit Canyon (if some­one can cor­rect me if I’m wrong, please do so.)

Bring cram­pons as this trek needs them. You can also walk along the top of the canyon if you have ropes to rap­pel into the top part of the canyon.

Will need crampons for this section
Will need cram­pons for this sec­tion
Ice statues
Ice stat­ues
Ice statues
Ice stat­ues
End of the line unless you have ice climbing gear
End of the line unless you have ice climb­ing gear
Another ice fall to negotiate
Anoth­er ice fall to nego­ti­ate
If you can't walk, slide
If you can’t walk, slide

Access to this area is on Maligne Lake road south of the Maligne Hos­tel. You will come to a bridge where the canyon joins the Maligne riv­er.

RELATED LINKS:

Valley of the Five Lakes — Biking

A clas­sic trail that is fair­ly busy for hik­ers and bik­ers alike. There are a cou­ple of ways to access these beau­ti­ful lakes. For this post, we were on bikes using trails, 1, 9 and 12 to com­plete a loop from town.

Anthony riding the steep sections
Antho­ny rid­ing the steep sec­tions
Foot bridge over streams
Foot bridge over streams
Great vantage point
Great van­tage point
Lake 2 of Valley of the Five Lakes
Lake 2 of Val­ley of the Five Lakes
trail-1-9-12_1258
Beau­ti­ful glacial col­ors
trail-1-9-12_1272
Nice rest area along the lake

 

Right from town, we head for Old Fort Point where you can catch Trail 1 and con­nect with Trail 9 then com­ing out of the south access trail­head for Val­ley of the Five Lakes. This park­ing lot is quite small and often the vehi­cles are parked along the 93 Ice­field Park­way.

The foot bridge access The foot bridge access

Rid­ing a bike gives you many options to divert to oth­er trails. Plus you do not need to find park­ing or burn any fos­sil fuel.

Trail 12 along the highwayTrail 12 along the high­way

Trail 12 has devel­oped quite well for the folks who don’t want to be too deep into the back­coun­try and access to their camp­sites and bun­ga­lows.